Anon vs Bajrush Kelmendi

Following on from a training session run by our Middlesex captain Adam Cranston, our Wiley Old Silver Fox of a Chairman, Bajrush, had the opportunity to use some of the points he learned that evening in a game the following week. Adam favours the “London System“, and Bajrush was able to take the theory and use it to his advantage.

[pgn]
[White “Anonymous”]
[Black “Kelmendi, Bajrush”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “tbc”]
[BlackElo “183”]
[WhiteTitle “”]
[BlackTitle “”]

*[/pgn]

Everyone who was at the last training session will know about Adam’s preferred “London System” opening. He played White in the system, with opening pawn moves on d4, c4, then after Bf4, King pawn to e3. We played it three times on the night, with his system facing my preferred system opening in which a Bishop pair sits on the 7th Rank: after g6, Bg7, then after b6, Bb7. I won all three matches on the night but what was really interesting was that I faced the London System in London League 3 the week after the training.

[pgn]
1.d4 g6 2.c4 Bg7 3.Nc3 b6 4.Bf4 Bb7 5.e3 e6 6.Nf3 Ne7

{[pgndiagram] So this is my first 6 moves as Black against almost any White opening.

What I did learn during the training was that the London system is not a very attacking opening system – it’s more of a tactical system, so I’m able to play my system comfortably in a match. With my system, the idea is to break the centre and make my Bishops very active. In most of the games I have played this system the opponent will try to attack on the King side, and if I can hold off the attack I will do ok during the game. Also, controlling the centre and the c-file is very important.}

7.Be2 d5 8.O-O O-O 9.Rc1 c6 10.Qb3 Nd7 11.a4 dxc4 12.Bc4 Nd5 13.Bg5 Bf6 14.Bh6 Re8 15.Ne4 Be7 16.Neg5 Bf8 17.Bf8 Nf8 18.e4 Nc7 19.h4 h6 20.Nh3 b5 21.Be2 a6 22.Rfd1 Nd7 23.Nf4 Rc8 24.axb5 cxb5

{[pgndiagram]I could have lost control of the c-file but for compensation will win h2/b8 black diagonal, which will be very important later in the game.}

25.Qe3 Nf6 26.Bd3 Qe7 27.Ne5 Kg7 28.Nc6 Bc6 29.Rc6 e5 30.dxe5 Qe5

{[pgndiagram]In this position I have decided to give up the a6 pawn in compensation for a better position for the Knight.}

31.Bb1 Red8 32. Nd3 Qe7 33.Rdc1 Ne6 34.Ra6 Nd4

{[pgndiagram] 31…Red8 moves the Rook from a bad pin. 34…Nd4 puts the Knight in a good position. I thought with a little tactical manoeuvring with my Queen I could move his Queen from the squares protecting the Knight fork on e2.}

35.Re1 Qb7 36.Nc5 Qc7 37.Rc1 Ng4 38.Qd4 Rd4

{[pgndiagram]With 36…Qc7 I take control of the h2-b8 diagonal. White’s move 37 was the one I was hoping for. With 37…Ng4 White has to move the Queen away from the squares protecting the  Knight fork on e2. Queen has to move to h3 to protect check mate with Qh2+. After 38…Rd4, White resigned. }
*[/pgn]

A very good game won as a result of the previous weeks training :o)

Full version:

[pgn navigation_board=below animation_speed=0 show_move_arrow=false]1.d4 g6 2.c4 Bg7 3.Nc3 b6 4.Bf4 Bb7 5.e3 e6 6.Nf3 Ne7 7.Be2 d5 8.O-O O-O 9.Rc1 c6 10.Qb3 Nd7 11.a4 dxc4 12.Bc4 Nd5 13.Bg5 Bf6 14.Bh6 Re8 15.Ne4 Be7 16.Neg5 Bf8 17.Bf8 Nf8 18.e4 Nc7 19.h4 h6 20.Nh3 b5 21.Be2 a6 22.Rfd1 Nd7 23.Nf4 Rc8 24.axb5 cxb5 25.Qe3 Nf6 26.Bd3 Qe7 27.Ne5 Kg7 28.Nc6 Bc6 29.Rc6 e5 30.dxe5 Qxe5 31.Bb1 Red8 32.Nd3 Qe7 33.Rdc1 Ne6 34.Ra6 Nd4 35.Re1 Qb7 36.Nc5 Qc7 37.Rc1 Ng4 38.Qd4 Rd4*[/pgn]